Can Samoyeds Live In Hot Weather? What Experts Say

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Unless you live in an especially cool area, you likely have to deal with warm weather, especially in the summers. In July 2021, the contiguous U.S. temperature was 75.5°F — a stark contrast to the often frigid temperatures of Siberia, the Samoyed’s homeland.1

If you live in a state with a warm climate, you may be wondering, “Can Samoyeds live in hot weather?” We asked an expert to give us their opinions and tips on how to keep your Samoyed comfortable year-round. 

Can Samoyeds live in hot weather? 

Samoyeds are known for their gorgeous, fluffy white coats. According to the AKC, the all-white coat is “impervious to cold.”2 Dr. Linda Simon, a veterinary surgeon and veterinary consultant with FiveBarks, said that Samoyeds are uniquely designed to handle cold. 

“Samoyeds originated in northern Siberia and are adapted to freezing cold, harsh weather conditions,” she said. “They have a plush double coat that is thought to offer as much insulation as sheep’s wool. Their broad and flat paws evolved to cope well in the snow and they can move with ease over snowy ground.”

If their owners don’t take proper precautions, Samoyeds can have issues living in hot weather. 

“Sadly, they can struggle to cope, especially when owners are unaware of their needs,” Dr. Simon warned. “These dogs are much more prone to suffering from heat stroke; a condition whereby they are unable to regulate their temperature and can even pass away.”

So does that mean you should never own a Samoyed in hot weather? Not exactly; it all comes down to the Samoyed’s living conditions. Many owners report that their Samoyeds do just fine in warmer weather; they are adaptable, and can adjust to the heat if their owners take extra care to keep them comfortable. 

5 Tips for keeping your Samoyed cool

You can help your dog handle the hot weather and prevent heat stroke by following these precautions: 

1. Keep your dog in air conditioned rooms 

If you want to own a Samoyed and live in a hot area, air conditioning is a must; fans and open windows just aren’t sufficient to keep double-coated breeds comfortable. You can let your dog outside for bathroom breaks and short  play sessions. But when you can’t actively supervise your dog, they need to be in an air conditioned space. 

If you don’t have central air conditioning in your home, you can purchase relatively inexpensive window units or portable air conditioners. They can only cool small rooms, but you can set them up in a bedroom and confine your Samoyed to that room to ensure they’re comfortable. 

[Note: If you live in an area that is prone to power outages and summer storms, make sure you have a disaster plan — the Humane Society of the United States has excellent tips to help you create your own. If the power goes out and temperatures are hot, you may have to consider getting a pet-friendly hotel room, boarding your dog in a kennel, or staying at a friend’s home to keep your pet safe until power is restored.]

2. Groom your Samoyed

Grooming your Samoyed can help eliminate the loose undercoat, keeping your dog cooler. You can make your dog more comfortable with regular brushing — including with an undercoat rake — and blowing out their coats with a high-velocity dryer

However, you shouldn’t shave your dog’s coat. 

“It is not advised to shave a Samoyed as their coat helps to insulate them and protects them from both the heat and the cold,” said Dr. Simon. “They also rely on their dense fur to offer sun protection as their pink skin is prone to sunburn.”

3. Exercise carefully

While Samoyeds are active dogs and need a good deal of exercise, you have to be very careful in the summer. Limit walks and play sessions to early mornings and evenings when it’s coolest. Avoid any exercise during the hottest hours of the day, typically between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.3 

Pro tip: If you only have a short amount of time to walk your dog in the morning, you can make it more challenging by putting a canine backpack on your Samoyed. Freeze water bottles overnight and place them in the backpack when you head out on your walks — the added weight will make the walk more challenging, so your dog will be satisfied with a shorter walk. 

4. Provide extra cold spaces

If you can, try to make certain places extra cold for your Samoyed. Providing them with a cold mat and a fan gives them a place to escape to when they’re hot. You can even place mats in your dog’s crate if that’s where they usually rest. 

5. Ensure cold water is always available

Always make sure your dog has access to cold, fresh water. You will likely find that your Samoyed drinks a lot more water in the summer months. If you’re sick of filling up their bowl every hour, invest in a gravity waterer instead. You can fill it up with ice cubes, and your dog will have constant access to cool water. 

If you’re taking a dog for a walk — even if it’s just a 20-minute stroll — take water with you. After testing dozens of them, this portable water bottle is our favorite; it’s completely mess-free and doesn’t leak. 

Caring for your dog

Can Samoyeds live in hot weather? Yes, but with caution. Their natural climate is significantly colder than most places in the United States. During the warm months, you’ll have to take extra steps to keep your dog comfortable. 


Make sure you understand the signs of heatstroke in dogs so you can prevent your Samoyed from becoming seriously ill.

Sources

  1. National Centers for Environmental Information. “Assessing the U.S. Climate in July 2021.” Accessed August 31, 2021. https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/news/national-climate-202107
  2. AKC. “Samoyed.” Accessed August 31, 2021. https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/samoyed/
  3. The Old Farmer’s Almanac. “What Is the Hottest Time of Day?” Accessed August 31, 2021. https://www.almanac.com/fact/what-is-the-hottest-time-of-dayr